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17 Articles about the most beautiful places in America

 

Teton National Park

Teton National Park, Wyoming

Visiting Teton National Park in Wyoming: My early memorites of the Tetons plus the best of the Tetons off the beaten track.

I first visited the Tetons when I was seven years old, in 1947. I grew up in Wyoming and when I was a little kid, our family used to take at least one vacation in the Tetons every year. One of my most vivid childhood memories is pulling into Jenny Lake campground, finding the world's best campsite, setting up our antique, 100 pound, canvas umbrella tent and listening to the sound of stakes being pounded into the ground, ringing and echoing in the still, pine scented air of the Tetons. Oddly enough, that sound is one of my strongest childhood memories.

Read the entire article.

Glacier National Park, Part I


Glacier National Park, Part I

 

Visiting and Photographing Glacier National Park in Montana.

Part I

Our favorite time to visit the park is in the fall when the leaves are turning and most of the summer swarms of tourists have left for the season. The disadvantage of visiting in the fall season is that pretty much everything shuts down by late September; it can be difficult to find a restaurant that isn't boarded up, or even an open grocery store or a place to buy gas at this time of year. It's amazing how quickly the bustling park of the summer months returns to the solitude of rural Western America--and just how isolated rural western America actually is. However, the lonesomeness and quiet and solitude of one of the most beautiful places on earth, as well as the gorgeous fall colors make this season more than worth while, at least for us.

Read the entire article.

 

Glacier National Park, Part II


Glacier National Park, Park II

 

Visiting and Photographing Glacier National Park in Montana.

Part II

Many people have praised the Going to the Sun highway as one of the most beautiful and scenic mountain roads anywhere. In my opinion they are not far wrong. The towering mountain wall that the road switch-backs up is called the Garden Wall, so named for the hanging ferns and wildflowers that line its crevices and ledges for thousands of vertical feet. Many of the pull offs on this road are worth stopping at for a picture.

Read the entire article.

 

Glacier National Park, Part III


Glacier National Park, Part III

 

Visiting and Photographing Glacier National Park in Montana.

Part III

At this same spot on the shore of St. Mary Lake, look closely into the water right along the shore. There are thousands of thin little flakes of rock like miniature playing cards of various shapes and colors and sizes that wash ashore here and which are then sorted by the wind and waves into intricate little patterns of similar shapes that are astoundingly beautiful. These patterns constantly shift and change and re-sort themselves into new designs and patterns. The rocks are quite small and mostly underwater right by the shoreline and you have to look closely to see them. Joan and I once spent hours watching these little rocks sort themselves into different shifting patterns and trying unsuccessfully to take pictures of them. It may have been the high winds and big waves that were causing this phenomenon the day we were there, but I'll bet there are many days when you can see this happening.

Read the entire article.

Rainier National Park in Washington

Visiting Raineer National Park. Many pictures included.

My two favorite parts of the Park are the Paradise and Sunrise areas. Paradise is on the South side of the Park and Sunrise on the North side. Paradise is the most heavily visited part of the part, but it is very much worth spending some time there. Paradise has some great trails; some are short and easy and some are hard and long and go all the way up to the very base of Rainier. Here you will find many, many meadows crowded with some of the best Wildflowers I have ever seen, as well as tons of beautiful waterfalls.

Read the entire article

Bosque del Apache Wildlife Refuge

Bosque del Apache Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico

The autumn bird migration in Bosque del Apache

The big event at dawn is called the lift-off. First one or two birds will fly off into the sky, and then a few more and then suddenly every bird in the pond, often thousands, will explode into the dawn sky, with a tremendous roar, all at the same moment. This doesn't always happen quite so dramatically but often it does. And when it does, it is one of the most beautiful, exhilarating things you will ever experience. The whole atmosphere of quiet rosy dawn, the subdued honking and gabbling of the birds and then boom, the sky explodes with birds lifting off into the dawn in a glorious spectacle you will never, ever forget.

Read the entire article

 

The beauty of the American Southwest

Taking Scenic photographs of the Southwest.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
This picture of Deadhorse Point in Utah is
one of the pictures I took on my 2010
Southwest Photography trip.

Photoshoot of the Southwest including many new pictures.

Here is an article about a photo trip I tookin May 2010. I was in New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. I visited twelve National Parks and areas that should have been National Parks and I shot over 7000 images.

The article contains 21 pictures of the best scenery of the southwest from Petrified Forest National Park, to Grand Canyon, Zion, Capital Reef, Arches, Bryce, Canyonlands and a lot more.

The artical also contains a link to a slideshow with 60 more new pictures of the Southwest.

Read the entire article.

 

Last Dollar Road in Colorado


Last Dollar Road in Colorado

 

This is one of the best roads on which to view the majestic fall aspens of Colorado. This article contains directions for getting there and how to best enjoy this great road.

Read the entire article

 

Rocky Mountain National Park I


Rocky Mountain National Park, Part 1

 

Rocky Mountain National Park: Part I Rocky Mountain National Park is the gem of the Colorado Rockies. The Park spreads out on both sides of the continental divide and its mountainous terrain can be seen from the eastern plains of Colorado to the deserts of Utah. In the winter it's massive summits are covered with up to 20 feet of snow, in the summer it is one of the best wildflower viewing areas in the Rockies, and in the fall there are tremendous displays of quaking aspen. As a result, Rocky Mountain National Park offers some of the best hiking, climbing and scenery in the American West

This part of the article concentrates on Bear Lake Road, one of the most scenic sections of the Park.

Read the entire article.

 

Rocky Mountain National Park II


Rocky Mountain National Park, Part 2

 

Rocky Mountain National Park, Part II In this section of the article, Part II, I discuss the best places to take pictures and hike in the area right around Bear Lake itself as well as a couple more great areas on the eastern slope of the park.

Read the entire article

 

Yankee Boy Basin in Colorado


The Wildflowers of Yankee Boy Basin

 

The Wildflowers of Yankee Boy Basin, 2005 Yankee Boy Basin is probably the number one wildflower location in Colorado. Here are some directions for visiting this beautiful alpine area.

Read the entire article

 

Shrine Pass in Colorado

The Wildflowrs of Shrine Pass

 

One of the best wildflower displays in Colorado is located on Shrine Pass just a few miles off of I 70 near Vail, not far from Denver. Here is an article on how to get there and what to do when you arrive.

Read the entire article

Gothic Valley in Colorado

 


The Wildflowers of Gothic Valley near Crested Butte, CO

 

Gothic Valley near Crested Butte Colorado Gothic Valley is located north of Crested Butte, Colorado. Just take the road to the little ghost town of Gothic where the University of Colorado Science camp is located and keep going until you reach the beautiful flower filled valley.

Read the entire article.

Wind River Mountains I

Hiking in Wyomings Wind River Mountains.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
The Wind River Range of Wyoming

 

The Wind River
Range of Wyoming,
Part I
The Wind Rivers are one of my all-time favorite places in the world. I've been hiking and backpacking in the Winds for the last forty years and they have been been the scene of some of the best times in my life. Here are some ways to discover the best of the Wind Rivers for yourself. This is article one of two.

Read the entire article.

Wind River Mountains II

Wildflowers in the Wind River Mountains.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
The Wind River Range of Wyoming, Part 2

 

The Wind River
Range of Wyoming,
Part II
This part of the Wind River article focuses on the Green River Lakes area of the Wind River Mountains. Included are several of my all-time favorite hikes in the unsurpassed alpine beauty of this region: wildflowers, jagged peaks, water falls and crystal clear rivers.

Read the entire article.

Wind River Backpack

Wind River backkpacking.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

Wind River Odyssey, Part 1

Wind River Odyssey
Part I
This is the first part of a multipart article on my recent (August 2008) eight day photographic backpack into the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming. It is a story of the trip plus numerous digressions into what I hope are interesting aspects of what it takes to do such a trip: equipment, lightweight backpacking, the lost art of topographic map reading and off-trail route finding, wilderness fishing, what does and doesn’t work with lightweight wilderness photography, and the joys and tribulations of extended wilderness foot travel.

Read the entire article.

The Maroon Bells

Maroon Bells, Colorado.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
The Maroon Bells is one of the most
beautiful spots in the world

The Maroon Bells

The Maroon Bells are definitely one of the premier scenic locations not only in Colorado but in the whole world. The mountains are not only huge but extremely scenic since they lie at the far end of a classic U shaped mountain valley. In the fall they reach the peak of their beauty when the aspens that cover the high mountains on both the right and left sides of the valley turn yellow and gold and red. To top it off, the whole scene is perfectly reflected in the waters of Maroon Lake.

Read the entire article.

Gila Wilderness Backpack

Backpacking in Gila Wilderness.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
The Gila Wilderness is one of the more lonely
wilderness areas in the US
Gila Wilderness Backpack

Gila Wilderness Backpack

Last week, near the end of March, eight of us set out from the Visitor Center near the Gila Cliff Dwellings in Southen New Mexico for a five day backpack in the canyons and mesas on the east side of Middle Fork of the Gila River.

Read the entire article about the Gila Wilderness and see the pictures I took there.

 

Green River Raft Trip

Green River Utah, Cliffs and Dawn

The Green River in Utah

 

Green River Raft Trip

It had been a long time since I had rafted Desolation and Grays. The last time was at least 30 years ago when Mike was 13 and his younger brother Jeff was 6. That was the trip when Jeff and his mother Joan topped a high curling wave in their raft and dropped unexpectedly into Surprise Rapid. That was the moment Jeff renamed the rapid for all time as "Holy-Shit-Mom-Rapid." It had been a good trip and I was ready for a replay...

Read the entire article

Four Articles about displaying photographs

Archival Life of Photographs


How Long Do Photographs Last?

 

The Archival Life of Photographs, How Long do Photographs Last. Only a few years ago color photographs did not last longer than ten years or so before they began fading and discoloring. Now-a-days there is no excuse for any color photograph not lasting at least sixty-five years and most probably 100 years. Unfortunately, those photographs that fade in ten years are still being made. It is all in how they are printed and what they are printed on. Here are the facts about the archival life of photographs and how to know which are good and which are bad.

Read the entire article.

 

The very best way to frame our photographs

The best way to frame our photographs

 

Using the Gallery Mount technique as done by Reed Photo in Denver to frame our pictures

Reed's Gallery Mount is a procedure where a photograph is laminated and then mounted to a heavy base using an acid-free archival adhesive. The photograph is then finished with several styles of very professional looking edges. Glass is not used as the picture is completely protected by the lamination. A special hanging device is attached to the back of the picture for hanging.

We think this kind of laminated framing is the best way to frame our photographs. This is mainly because lamination eliminates almost all glare and reflection from pictures. You can't even see the lamination; it is completely invisible, yet it removes almost all glare and reflections. Looking at a laminated picture is almost like looking out of a window it is so clear and life-like. We think this technique is far superior to using mat and glass to frame a picture.

Read the entire article

 

 

What exactly is lamination?

Laminated pictures are often used as home

and office decor.

Laminating Photographs to Eliminate Glare and Reflections
We think that the best way to frame pictures is to laminate them and then frame them without mat or glass. The picture is completely protected, yet there is none of the glare and reflections caused by glass, even reflection control glass, that often make framed pictures almost impossible to see. Looking at a laminated picture is almost like looking at the real world through a large window.

Read the entire article

Framing very large photographs

Framing large photographs.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

How to Frame Very Large Pictures

 

How to Frame Very Large Pictures: May 2007 Huge Pictures require special techniques. This is an article on some of the best techniques for framing very large pictures.

Read the entire article.

 

Six Articles about Fred, Jeff and Joan Hanselmann

 

Becoming a professional photograher, Part 1,

by Jeff Hanselmann

 

 

A story about becoming a professional photographer

 

A story about becoming a professional landscape photographer.

How does one become an artist, in this case, a fine-art landscape photographer? Is it something we're born with, is it taught? What about for someone who is half way through their life and decides to be an artist? Is it too late? These are just a few of the questions that went through my mind as I read my father’s email asking me if I'm interested in becoming a partner in his photo business and eventually taking it over.

The first thing you need to know about me is that I know nothing about photography-- zero, zip, nada. I'm a point and shoot kinda guy...

Read the entire arrticle.

 

 

 

Fred and Joan Hanselmann

Fred Hanselmann using a large format Film camera

Fred Hanselmann with large format camera in Colorado

 

Joan Photographing at McDonald Lake

Joan Hanselmann shooting in Glacier National Park in Montana

Read the entire article about Fred and Joan

 

About Fred and Joan Hanselmann

Both Joan and I have a great love for the mountains and rivers and deserts of the American west. I suppose this came from our childhoods. We both grew up in Wyoming and learned at an early age to love the wild places around us. Joan grew up camping and fishing and hiking with her family in the Wind River Mountains in the North-western part of the state.

I had similar experiences. When I was between ten and fourteen or so, my parents would often take my brother and I on a series of wonderful summer vacation trips to the great National Parks of the West. Since we lived in Wyoming, one of the places we often visited was Grand Teton National Park. I can still remember one magic morning when we got up very early to go on a hike.....

Read the entire article

 

Moving from Colorado to New Mexico

After 14 years in Colorado we moved back to New Mexico

 

Our lives and homes in Colorado and New Mexico

At first, I was very hesitant to leave Howard as I love Colorado, I love the mountains where we lived and I love the house that Joan and I built there. However, after 14 years, Joan was sick and tired of four or five or six feet of snow every winter at the 7800 foot level of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains where we lived. It wasn't just the snow she hated, it was also the fact that we lived a half mile off the main county road that was the only regularly plowed road in the area.  The 1/2 mile long spur road to our house mostly got kind-of-plowed by locals with snowplows on their jeeps and pickups, but usually the only way into our driveway was a narrow, one car wide track surrounded by four foot walls of hard packed snow. One little twitch of the steering wheel and you were in for a several hour shoveling session unless some good samaritan came along and pulled you out.......

Read the entire article

 

 

When Fred and Joan Dropped out to become
artists forty years ago

How to do art shows.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Dropping out and becoming an artist

 

What happens when
you decide to drop out, quit you day job and become an artist

The story of how two very, young, idealistic artists, my wife Joan and myself, dropped out of the (what was know at the time as the rat-race) and began a "kind-of-idyllic-life-in-the-country" and then decided to finance this scheme by selling art on the sidewalk.

Read the entire article.

 

Fred and Joan used to be potters, long ago

Art Shows.  How to start.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
How Joan and I began our art career as
potters, way back in 1973

 

How Joan and I began
our lives on the
art-show road.

A couple of years ago during a very busy art show in Breckenridge, Colorado, I was taking a break on a bench a few yards away from my booth. A well dressed gentleman and and an equally well attired young son of twelve or so stopped in front of me and looked at my booth. The father pointed at my booth and said to the son, "And here is a good object lesson for you son. Pay attention in school and study hard or you may end up on the streets just like these poor folks." Here is the story of how I drifted away from a life of comfort and respectability to became an artist selling my work on the art show circuit.

Read the entire article.

The hardest part of being an artist

Learning to be an artist.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Parking is the Hardest Part of Being an Artist

 

Parking is the hardest part of being an artist.

What is the hardest part of being an artist? Most people think it is making the art. They think that if only they could paint or draw or sculpt or pot or take pictures as well as so-and-so, all the rest would be easy. Wrong.

Read the entire article.

 

Great Art Show Disasters

 


Great Art Show Disasters

 

Great Art Show Disasters

High winds have been a part of many art show disasters. I have seen a whole row of tents tumbling down the middle of the street like tumbleweeds in a spring dust storm on the Texas plains. I have seen tents hanging from stoplights suspended over a busy street corner. I have seen tents impaled on balconies three stories above the street.

Read the entire article

 

38 Articles on landscape photography technique

 

Photographic Composition I


Basic Photographic Composition, Part 1

 

Basic Photographic Composition,

Part I

The basic rules of composition are simple. In my opinion they are: 1) Framing the picture (i.e., selecting just the right piece of the real world in your camera view finder). 2) Making sure the picture has a subject or at least a main point of interest. 3) Using foreground properly. 4) Developing depth in the picture. 5) Using line and space and shape and color to create an image that pleases the eye and the soul. I will cover all these subjects in this series of articles.

Read the entire article

Photographic Composition II


Basic Photographic Composition, Part 2

 

Basic Photographic Composition,

Part II

It's not enough to get rid of the junk though, you also have to limit the number of wonderful, beautiful things in a picture. One problem I constantly have is seeing a lot of beautiful stuff in a scene and wanting to get it all into the picture. Everything is relevant, nothing is junk, I want it all. I want that great stream winding through the meadow, plus the daisies in the foreground, plus the mountains in the background, plus that wonderful gnarled tree over there, plus those deer standing way over there in that bunch of trees.

Wrong, Wrong Wrong.

Read the entire article

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic Photograpic Compositon, Part 3

 

Basic Photographic Composition

Part III

The corollary to this rule is that it is not even necessary to find a whole sea of flowers in the first place. Just one small, magnificent bunch will do. Get good and close to the one lonesome bunch, and they are better than a whole sea of flowers. You can do the same thing with reflections in a lake. A whole lake isn't necessary for a good reflection shot; if you get close enough, a small pond or even a puddle will fill the picture and work just as well as a whole huge lake. Actually the puddle usually works much better than the whole lake.

Read the Entire Article

Basic Photographic Composition, Part 4

 

Basic Photographic Compositon

Part IV

A corollary of never centering anything is the rule of balance. Even though nothing should be exactly centered, a picture should also feel balanced when you look at it. It shouldn't feel as if it is tipping over to one side or the other. Avoid putting a large mass of anything over to one side and nothing on the other. I once ruined a great shot of a wonderful mountain valley full of wildflowers this way. I composed the picture with a huge mountain ridge running diagonally down from the top right to the bottom center of the picture. The huge ridge filled the whole right side of the picture. The picture was way to heavy on the ridge side. No matter how I cropped the picture during printing nothing helped. I finally had to toss it out.

Read the Entire Article

 

Buying a Digital Camera

l


How to Buy a digital Camera


How to Buy a Digital Camera

Buying a digital camera can be complicated. If you go to Best Buy or WalMart or some such big box discount store you are confronted with a whole rack of cameras and about the best you can do is maybe choose a name brand and megapixal size and hope for the best. However, there is a much better way of going about this.

Read the entire article

 

Depth of Field I


Depth of Field 1

 

Depth of Field 1: Great depth of field usinsg small point and shoot cameras. The number one professional technique for making dramatic landscape photographs is to use depth of field to keep both the close foreground and the distant background in sharp focus. Here is how do to it on your digital camera.

Read the entire article.

 

Depth of Field II

Depth of Field in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography..
Depth of Field, part 2.

How to get both sharp foreground and background all
at the same time when using SLR cameras.

Depth of Field II. Getting great depth of field when shooting with SLR cameras. Article 2 on depth of field.

Several years ago I wrote an article called Depth of Field, Part 1. That article was a very good introduction to the basic principles of depth of field and described how to get good depth of field when shooting small point-and-shoot cameras.

The current article is about how to achieve a great depth of field when using using SLR cameras, not point-and-shoot cameras. SLR cameras are larger, more professional cameras with interchangeable lenses. Since more and more people are buying digital SLRs, I thought I had better update the article on depth of field.

Read the entire article.

 

Good Light is Crucial

Good light is critical in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Good Light is Crucial for Great Photographs

 

Good Light

One of the most basic principles of photography is shooting in good light.  Everyone knows, even non-photographers, that you should take photographs early in the morning or late in the evening.  We all know this truism, but it is amazing how easy it is to forget it, since we have all taken lots of pretty good, mediocre but still pretty good, photos in all kinds of light.

Read the entire article.

 

Taking Wildflower Pictures I


How to Take Pictures of Wildflowers, Part 1

 

How to take pictures of wildflowers
Part 1
My best secrets for taking pictures of wildflowers. Shooting them in the correct light is essential. I discuss how to keep both the flowers and the background sharp, filling the frame with flowers and other techniques for great wildflower pictures.

Read the entire article.

 

Taking Wildflower Pictures II

 

Using a diffuser when photographing wildflowers.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

How To Take Pictures of Wildflowers, Part 2

Taking Pictures of Wildflowers, Part 2

In part one of "How to Shoot Wildflowers" I advised you to wait for a cloudy day, or at least not shoot until a big cloud floated by to soften and diffuse the harsh light of the sun. I also advised that you might want to use a two or three foot diameter diffusing screen that you hold between the sun and the flower to soften the light. However, I stated that I really don't use diffusing screens and mostly just waited for a passing cloud or even came back later on a cloudy day.

In this article, I discuss my recent conclusion that I really do need to use a diffusing screen and how such a screen really can make a huge difference in how your wildflower pictures look.

Read the entire article

 

Taking Sharp Pictures

How to take sharp pictures.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
How to Take Sharp Pictures


How to Take Sharp Pictures

Taking sharp pictures is an art. There is a lot to it and whole books have been written on the subject. However, the basics are not all that hard. This article is an introduction to the basics of taking and printing sharp pictures.

Read the entire article

Photoshop is essential for serious photographers

Using photoshop in scenic landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Using Photoshop is Essential for Serious Photographers

Photoshop is Crucial

 

All real landscape photographers use Photoshop to bring a scene back to what it actually looked like before the camera screwed it up.  For example, cameras don't see nearly as many levels of brightness as the human eye does.  This is why photographs often show what was originally a bright blue sky as blank white or why they show the gorgeous shadows at dusk and dawn as pure black.  One of the main jobs of photoshop is to fix problems like this.

Read the entire article.

Digital Disasters

Digital disasters in scenic, landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography..
Digital Disasters

 

Digital Disasters

Because almost all photographic shooitng and printing is now digital, we are capable of making photographs far more beautiful and far more faithful to the real world than we ever have before. And as everyone who regularly deals with computers knows, it also means living with a bunch of very complex, temperamental  equipment that goes haywire pretty regularly.

Read the entire article

Art and the Every-day World


Landscape Photography as Art

Good landscape photography is always a combination of good camera technique and a more creative element that is usually called something like artistic vision. (Words like art and artistic sound hopelessly pretentious to me, but I can't seem to come up with a better word so I guess I'll have to use them.)

 

 

Read the entire article

Professional Photographers

How professional photographers work.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
How Professional Photographers Work

 

One of the questions I am most often asked is "Why don't my pictures look like yours. What are you doing that I'm not doing?" This article is a summary of how professional landscape photographers work: what kind of equipment they use, their shooting techniques and how they print such great pictures.

Read the entire article.

 

Digital Photography I

Digital Photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Digital Photography 101, Part 1
Shooting Modes

 

Digital Photography 101, Part I:

Part I
Shooting Modes

It is critically important to set up your digital camera correctly. This article covers setting up shooting modes. It is also a general article on lens aperture, shutter speed and bracketing. I discuss program mode, aperture priority, shutter priority, manual mode as well as an introduction to exposure and depth of field.

Read the entire article.

Digital Photography II

Digital Photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Digital Photography 101, Part 2
Choosing a file format

 

Digital Photography 101, Part 2,

Part2:
Choosing a file format

This article is about how to choose the proper file format for your digital camera. It makes a big difference whether you choose tiff format, Jpg format or RAW format. This article also includes an introduction to using Photoshop to edit your pictures and using Epson Printers to print them.

Read the entire article.

Digital Photography III

Digital Photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Digital Photography 101, Part 3
Basics

 

Digital Photography 101, Part 3

Part 3, Basics.

This article covers setting your camera for the proper image size and shape, white balance, flash, digital zoom and ISO settings. Get these basics right and your pictures will be far better.

Read the entire article.

Digital Photography IV

Digital Photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Digital Photography 101, Part 4
Understanding Exposure

 

Digital Phototography 101, Part 4,

Part 4: Understanding Exposure.

Getting the exposure exactly right gives your pictures a professional look. I discuss how to use exposure compensation to get beautiful pictures when the light is difficult as well as how to shoot winter scenes and dark scenes. Also included are pitfalls and stories of how I often manage to get it all wrong.

Read the entire article

Digital Photography V

exposure in digital photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Digital Photography 101, Part 5
Difficult Exposure Problems

Digital Photography 101, Part 5,

Part 5: difficult exposure problems

This article explains how to deal with difficult exposure problems such as a picture that has a very bright sky and a very dark foreground. If you just shoot the picture normally, the sky will end up pure white and the foreground will be black. When you know how, it's easy to get the correct exposure in both the bright parts and the dark parts of a picture. I also discuss the importance of setting up your digital camera for the correct saturation, sharpening and contrast. If you get these settings wrong, you can easily ruin every picture you take.

Read the entire article.

Walking with a camera I

Professional Phototographers never walk.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
This is a picture I took while walking with my camera
along the Maine Seacoast.

Walking With a Camera, Part 1: Pro-Photographs never walk

Here's the truth. Most professional landscape photographers are not hikers. Most great scenic photographs are shot very close to the road. Landscape photographers rarely or never hike to take pictures. Most of them don't even like walking. I was once one of these guys.

How do most professional landscape photographers get their pictures? How do I take my pictures now-a-days? Why, over the past ten years have I gradually moved away from the crowded "Great picture locations" and out to the more lonely trails. What is "Walking With a Camera" and how and where can you do it for the most fun and the best pictures. Read the entire article to find out.

Walking with a camera II

Best photo hikes.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
This is a picture I took while hiking on Shrine Pass in
Colorado, near Vail

 

Walking With a Camera, Part 2: Where and When

Part two of my ongoing series on Walking With a Camera is about where and when to walk with your camera. If you are wondering how to begin walking with your camera, here are some ideas that I have come up over the years to maximise both enjoyment and productivity. Here are the stories of how I do it.Read the entire article.

Walking with a camera III

Cameras for photo hikes.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

This picture was taken while walking along the Green
River in Utah

 

Walking With a Camera: Part 3, Cameras

This third article about Walking With a Camera is about buying a great camera for walking. I compare seven good to great cameras and discuss the strong and weak points of each. Also I cover important stuff you should know whenever you are buying a camera.

It you are in the market for a good camera, this is one of my best articles on the subject. Read the entire article.

Walking with a camera IV

Camera lenses for photo hikes.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

Grinnell Glacier Trail in Glacier National Park,
Montana. The best walk with a camera I ever took.

 

Walking With a Camera Part 4: Lenses

The best way to walk with a camera is to keep it very, very simple. This often means carrying just one lens. But if it's the wrong lens it can lead to disaster.

Read the stories of some of my disasters with lenses. Learn how to use and buy the right lenses. Plus my two favorite scenic locations in New Mexico. Plus some of the best of our new pictures for 2010.

Read the entire article.

Walking with a camera V

Backpacks for photohikes.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

Walking with a camera Part 5, Packs
The above pictures is in Arches National Park where
there are tons of great places to walk with a camera.

Walking with a Camera, Part 5, Packs

Most serious photographers spend tons of money on fancy, special back packs designed for carrying photo gear. This really doesn't work very well in practice. These packs work great for sorting out bunches of photo gear, several cameras and all the lenses you could ever want into nice neat little pockets. Unfortunately they don't work well as packs. They are horribly heavy and horribly uncomfortable and they often have no space for non-photographic stuff like water, parkas, fleece jackets, or lunch.

Here is an article about camera backpacks that actually work.

Read the entire article.

Walking with a camera VI

Books for photo hikes.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

Walking with a Camera, Part 6, Boots

 

Walking with a Camera, Part 6, Boots

Buying the right hiking boots is much more important, and
much harder than you might think.

One piece of equipment that is essential for walking with a camera is a good pair of hiking shoes. Worrying about what kind of shoes you are going to wear on a hike sounds a little silly, but there is a lot more to choosing hiking shoes than it seems.

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Walking with a camera VII

Point and shoot cameras for photo hikes.  Article about scenic landscape photography..

Walking with a Camera Part 7

 

Walking with a Camera Part 7, Basic Camera Technique 1

Using Point-and-Shoot Cameras for walking with a camera.

The very simplest way to hand-hold cameras and get good results is to use one of the better point and shoot cameras. These are the smaller cameras with a built in zoom lens and a built in flash. Many of these will take quite high quality pictures while handheld.

 

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Walking with a camera VIII

SLR Cameras for photo hikes.  Article about scenic landscape photography.

Walking with a Camera Part 8

 

Walking with a Camera Part 8, Basic Camera Technique 2

Using larger SLR type cameras for walking with a camera

If you are shooting a larger, SLR (Single Lens Reflex) camera that has exchangeable lenses, you definitely should be shooting using a stabilizer lens if you plan on doing a lot of hand-holding, which walking with a camera requires.

 

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Hand Held Camera I

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Hand HeldCameras Part 1
Introduction

 

Hand Held Cameras 1
Introduction

Hand holding a camera will immediately make any photographer much more creative and spontaneous. This is especially true if the camera has a long range zoom lens and you don't have to break your train of thought to dig out an new lens and put it on the camera. You can quickly shoot a distant scene with three different kinds of foreground or flop down on the ground and get all kinds of great close ups. It takes no time at all to take twenty shots from all kinds of different angles and positions that you would never have gotten had you been using a tripod.

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Hand Held Camera II

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Hand HeldCameras, Part2
The Olympus C8080

 

Hand Held Cameras 2
The Olympus C-8080

I had been in the Winds many times before and taken many pictures using film cameras but I had never been satisfied with the results. This year I wanted to shoot the Winds digitally. I wanted the best quality pictures but my best quality digital camera (a $8000.00 Canon 1Ds MarkII) weighed almost 7 pounds with a single lens and with my lighAllArticles tripod and tripod head the whole outfit weighed over fifteen pounds. This was just out of the question for someone who was no longer a young man. The maximum pack I could carry comfortably was no more than 40 pounds max, and I really wanted to go with no more than a 30 or 35 pound pack.So I decided to take my Olympus C-8080 and no tripod. This whole outfit weighs 2 pounds.

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Hand Held Camera III

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Hand HeldCameras, Part 3
The Green River in Utah

 

Hand Held Cameras 3
The Green River in Utah

My first thought was that I didn't want to take my good camera; it was sure to get full of sand and wet and ruined before the trip was over. So I decided to take my trusty Olympus C-8080. As described in my last post, I had good luck handholding it in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming the previous summer and I thought it would be perfect. It was.

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Hand Held Camera IV

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Hand HeldCameras, Part 4
The Canon Rebel Xsi

 

Hand Held Cameras 4
Canon Rebel Xsi

However, even though my Olympus was doing a pretty good job, I thought that maybe I needed a camera that had a little larger image size than the Olympus but that would still be very light, easy to handle and could be taken on long backpacking trips. Also, when shooting in RAW format, the Olympus is unbelievably slow and I really wanted to be able to shoot in RAW.After a bit of research on my favorite camera reviewsite, dpreview, I came up with the Rebel Xsi, also called the 450D.

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Hand Held Camera V

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography..
Hand HeldCameras, Part 5
Depth of Field Problems

 

Hand Held Cameras 5
Depth of Field

I shot the picture to the left in mid July on day one of my month long summer shoot. I was driving through the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado on my way to our old home in Howard, Colorado. I had my new Canon Rebel with the new Tamaron 18-270 lens on the passenger seat right beside me. It was so easy to stop and take pictures that I was stopping fairly regularly, wandering around a bit in the close vicinity of the car and shooting whatever looked good. In the location of the above picture I shot half a dozen pretty good images.

But I also made some serious mistakes.

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Hand Held Camera VI

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Hand Held Cameras, Part 6
High ISO and Noise

 

Hand Held Cameras 6
High ISO speed and Noise

There is a downside to using higher ISOspeeds; the higher they are, the more noise you add to a picture. In the case of my 1Ds Mark II, I'm lucky, it's a very good camera and there is not much noise added even at ISO 1000. There definitely is some though; however if the picture is not sharpened, almost all of this noise can be removed later in Photoshop and it will never be noticed.

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Hand Held Camera VII

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Hand Held Cameras, Part 7
More on Depth of Field

 

Hand Held Cameras 7
More on Depth of Field

There are several ways to get greater depths of field when shooting with hand held cameras.

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Hand Held Camera VIII

Hand held cameras in landscape photography.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
Hand Held Cameras, Part 8
Image Stabilization

 

Hand Held Cameras 8
Image Stabilization

Image stabilizers are a huge help when hand holding. Since this picture was shot with an image stabilized lens, I could shoot at a much slower speed than I usuallly would. I could use a smaller f-stops which enabled me to get a much better depth of field.

Often I don't have to resort to increasing ISO speed to get smaller f-stops, I just rely on the image stabilizer and shoot more slowly.

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Tripods, Part I

Tripods.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
To Use a Tripod or Not, Part 1

To Use a Tripod
or Not?

Part 1

The question, "To use a tripod or not?" is a pretty important question if you seriously want to take good pictures. Five years ago I answered this question with a most emphatic "Yes, of course, I always use a tripod. I haven't taken a picture without a tripod for twenty years." Now-a-days, with the advent of digital photography, the answer is not quite so simple.

In this part of the article, Part I, I discuss the reasons why use of a tripod is absolutely essential if you are serious about landscape photography and if you take outsanding nature photographs.

 

Tripods, Part II

Using Tripods.  Article about scenic landscape photography.
To use a Tripod of Not, Part 2

To Use a Tripod
or Not?

Part 2

I love to lie down on the ground with my little camera, snapping away at wildflowers, colorful lichens, dewy spider webs, lacey birch bark and what-not. Some surprisingly good pictures come out of this. This works especially well with wildflowers. An added advantage is that many smaller cameras have a built in flash which can be adjusted to a greater or lesser intensity and which can add immensely to close-up pictures taken close to the ground. The flash will add flawless lighting as well as stopping any wind movement as long as the distances are short.

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Main article types

17 Articles about the most beautiful places in America

4 Articles about displaying photographs

6 Articles about Fred and Joan Hanselmann

38 Articles on landscape photography technique

 

 

 

All of our articles.

Beautiful Places

Landscape Photo
Technique

Other

Teton National Park

Photographic composition, part 1

Photographic Composition , part 2

Photographic Composition , part 3

Photographic Compositon, part 4

How long do photographs last?
Glacier National Park 1   The very best way to frame our photographs
Glacier National Park 2

Depth of field 1

Framing very large photographs
Glacier National Park 3 Depth of field 2 Rocky Mountain Photography is Fred and Joan Hanselmann
The American Southwest Good light is crucial Where Fred and Joan Live
Last Dollar Road in Colorado Taking wildflower pictures 1 How Fred and Joan became artists long ago
Rocky Mountain National Park 1 Taking wildflower pictures 2 Fred and Joan used to be potters
Rocky Mountain National Park 2 Taking sharp pictures The hardest part of being an artist
Yankee Boy Basin in Colorado Photoshop is essential for serious photographers Great art show disasters
Shrine Pass in Colorado Digital Disasters The trees are dying
Gothic Valley in Colorado Art and the everyday world The glaciers are melting
Wind River Mountains in Wyoming 1 Professional Photographers Lamination is the best way to frame photographs.
Wind River Mountains in Wyoming 2 Digital Photography 101, part 1  
Wind River Backpack Digital Photography 101, part 2  
The Maroon Bells in Colorado Digital Photography 101, part 3  
The Gila Wilderness in New Mexico Digital Photography 101, part 4  
The Green River in Utah Digital Photography 101, part 5  
Bosque del Apache Wildlife Refuge Walking with a camera, part 1  
  Walking with a camera, part 2  
  Walking with a camera, part 3  
  Walking with a camera, part 4  
  Walking with a camera, part 5  
  Walking with a camera, part 6  
  Walking with a camera, part 7  
  Walking with a camera, part8  
  Tripods 1  
  Tripods 2  
  How we have made our photographs over the years  
  Using a Polarizing Filter  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 1  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 2  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 3  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 4  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 5  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 6  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 7  
  Hand-Holding Cameras (No Tripod), Part 8  
 

Articles about son Jeff learning to be a photographer

Becoming a professional photographer, part 1

Becoming a professional photographer, part 2